… bureaucracy entirely assumes for itself the power and functions of an exploiting class, the management of the production process at all levels, the disposition of the means of production and decision-making authority over the appropriation of surplus production.
Cornelius Castoriadis

“We often hear that our politicians lack imagination. Indeed, in the current world of global governance, politics seems to have been reduced to simple administration, within a general neoliberal consensus. In such a world there seems to be no space for imagination understood as the radical capacity to envisage things differently and construct alternative political projects. Those who argue that “another world is possible” – to quote a slogan of the new global movements – are easily labelled unrealistic, if not fanatical, and thus are excluded from the spectrum of viable political options.

Deprived of imagination, the political world we live in is, nonetheless, full of images.”

·         Chiara Bottici (2014) Imaginal Politics: Images Beyond Imagination and the Imaginary, Columbia University Press.

However much I might be inclined to portray Welsh Republicanism in a a heroic light, farce is never far away. I attended an Owain Glyndwr commemoration on a hilltop at Corwen in North Wales where Glyndwr was said to have first raised his standard. About 20 of us were listening to speeches on a windy day when a ruddy faced Manchester rambler chanced upon us. ‘What’s going on?’ he enquired seeing the berets and flags. ‘Commemoration to Owain Glyndwr,’ he was told. Getting out his Ordanance Survey map he helpfully observed what it was the ‘wrong mountain. It’s that one over there where Glyndwr raised his flag… cheerio,’ and wandered happily off. ‘Bloody English’ came the muttered oaths as we headed off to the correct spot.

From Ian Bone’s “Bash the Rich: True-life Confessions of an Anarchist in the UK”

http://www.tangentbooks.co.uk/

'The colossal figure of William Morris stands at the centre of Jeremy Deller’s exhibition. We sit starving amidst our gold, a mural executed by Stuart Sam Hughes, depicts Morris as a giant hurling Roman Abramovich’s yacht into the Venetian Lagoon. This refers to an incident in 2011 when Abramovich, a Russian oligarch, had moored the huge vessel alongside the Giardini, where the Biennale is held, preventing the public from enjoying the view or accessing the promenade. Deller imagines Morris as an avenging force, returning from the dead to punish the oligarch’s selfishness.'

http://www.apollo-magazine.com/political-arts/

'The colossal figure of William Morris stands at the centre of Jeremy Deller’s exhibition. We sit starving amidst our gold, a mural executed by Stuart Sam Hughes, depicts Morris as a giant hurling Roman Abramovich’s yacht into the Venetian Lagoon. This refers to an incident in 2011 when Abramovich, a Russian oligarch, had moored the huge vessel alongside the Giardini, where the Biennale is held, preventing the public from enjoying the view or accessing the promenade. Deller imagines Morris as an avenging force, returning from the dead to punish the oligarch’s selfishness.'

http://www.apollo-magazine.com/political-arts/